Please give us your feedback – post a comment

Last year at this time, CLIC began a year-long activity for professional development focusing on the book by Char Booth, Reflective Teaching/Effective Learning.  The steering committee  is wrapping up their work by completing a report on the activities held during the year.  Instead of issuing yet one more survey, we are asking everyone who participated in some way:

  • read the book
  • attended a discussion session
  • discussed the book at your own institution
  • attended the Char Booth talk
  • completed a survey
  • attended the follow up session in the spring
  • completed any of the exercises
  • submitted comments to the blog
  • other?

Please let us know if this was a worthwhile activity, or whether CLIC should continue to explore these types of opportunities, or if this was a complete waste of your time.   We’d like to hear from anyone and everyone who has a comment about the activities.  Feel free to share the “good, the bad, and the ugly.”  Please submit your comments no later than Friday, June 29.

Thank you very much for your feedback.

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11 Responses to Please give us your feedback – post a comment

  1. ellie says:

    I greatly appreciated the opportunity to participate even though I’m not at a CLIC library. I had wanted to read the book, but this motivated me to do so in a more timely fashion. And the talk/workshop was fantastic. Thanks again for opening it up.

  2. Ginny Heinrich says:

    The Good: I thought this was a worthwhile project and enjoyed having the focus of reading the book to compliment the workshop by Char Booth. I picked up several techniques that I have used since, in particular the 3 question reflection she suggested. It was easy to do that after an instruction session while ideas were still fresh.

    The Bad: I felt like the gaps between activities were too long and it made the events less connected for me. It was hard to build a lot of momentum around ideas given gaps between the blog activities, the book discussion group, the workshop with Char, and the follow-up activity in the spring. Maybe using some kind of ongoing online discussion/facilitation through the whole time period could help with that?

    The Ugly: Can’t think of anything that I thought was “ugly.”

    Thanks to everyone who worked on this. It will be a hard act to follow.

  3. Laura Secord says:

    This was a great opportunity. Char’s presentation/workshop was wonderful. Doing the pre-workshop assignments was a good way to force us to do some reading/thinking along the way but didn’t add a lot to my experience. I felt like we had some great brainstorming sessions at our tables at the workshop, but then didn’t have the time to set goals and plan how to implement ideas going forward. This was due in part to the timing of the workshop–just before the busiest time of year. The small group discussions would have been nice follow-up sessions instead of pre-workshop sessions. I changed my instruction somewhat as a result of the experience, but not as much as I might have if the workshop with Char Booth had happened in the less frenetic winter semester.

  4. Johan says:

    It was a great constructive opportunity to think about how the instruction experience can be improved. I liked that there were so many different ways to engage, including the talk, the book, the discussions before, during and after the event, the blog, etc. I vote in favor of CLIC continuing to explore these types of opportunities!

  5. Amy Sheehan says:

    I enjoyed the whole experience and hope that CLIC will continue to do these types of integrated, longer term discussions which involve more than one committee. In addition to Char’s talk and the group read of the book, I was especially pleased with the April 20 event on developing communities of practice and hope that new communities of practice will indeed emerge from that.

  6. Lyndi Finifrock says:

    Because of this experience I’m thinking about library instruction in a new way and feeling more in comfortable with it overall. I’m excited to continue implementing these ideas in library sessions!

  7. (From Laura Secord)

    This was a great opportunity. Char’s presentation/workshop was
    wonderful. Doing the pre-workshop assignments was a good way to force
    us to do some reading/thinking along the way but didn’t add a lot to
    my experience. I felt like we had some great brainstorming sessions
    at our tables at the workshop, but then didn’t have the time to set
    goals and plan how to implement ideas going forward. This was due in
    part to the timing of the workshop–just before the busiest time of
    year. The small group discussions would have been nice follow-up
    sessions instead of pre-workshop sessions. I changed my instruction
    somewhat as a result of the experience, but not as much as I might
    have if the workshop with Char Booth had happened in the less frenetic
    winter semester.

  8. Linda Hulbert says:

    I thought Char was a great choice for the kick-off. I read parts of the book and I attended her presentation. It has profoundly influenced the way I try to describe the work we do. Thinking about the library in ways our users do to try to change that – and to think about the students who assume the person at the desk is not there to help them, but is more of a hall-monitor. Wow!

    Thanks for bringing her in.

  9. Karen Hogan says:

    I attended the Char Booth talk with my “MLIS student” hat on. Library Instruction is not part of my CLIC duties, so I hadn’t thought to stay for the workshop. After hearing Char talk, I really wish I could have stayed for the rest of the event. I had not
    even thought of instruction as a career path, but after hearing Char I may rethink my resistance to move from Technical Services.I thought her ideas about “curriculum mapping” and “library as indicator species” were pure genius. I have since followed her blog, and others. (In the Library With the Lead Pipe )

    I attended the follow up session in the spring, again, more in a student role than a seasoned instructor. I wish more of my library school classmates could’ve been there to hear from academic librarians, to add on to their classroom lectures.

    I’m a big nerd, and like conferences and training sessions, so this kind of activity is something I’d like to see CLIC do more of. My coworkers may think it doesn’t have anything to do with their job, but I am thinking of using “curriculum mapping” and Lib Guides to how they may combine with the role of Course Reserves.

  10. Verena Getahun says:

    I read the book (most of it?), attended a small group discussion, prepared a sample teaching plan, and attended the all-day workshop with Char Booth. My short take on this exercise is that it was tangentially related to my actual job but nonetheless informative and stimulating. Teaching is almost nonexistent in my everyday job; I have only one student worker, whose training takes place over the course of about two weeks every few years! The standouts for me from Char’s book were the concise history of educational theory and her effervescent encouragement about the possibilities of improving one’s teaching. But try as I might, I couldn’t apply much of what I learned to my own job. However, I was grateful for the chance to understand more of what my colleagues in reference and instruction are grappling with, and I was cheered to see them gain confidence to try new things and…reflect more?

  11. Rhonda Gilbraith says:

    I read the book, attended Char’s talk and the accompanying workshop, and the followup event in the Spring. Her book was immensely helpful to me, and I found her presentation to be truly excellent. I appreciate that she is both an idealist and a pragmatist. She inspired me, and she equipped me with lots of usable techniques and approaches. I very much appreciate that CLIC put this together and gave us the opportunity to learn together.

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